Mobile phone users are not at increased risk of brain tumors, new study finds

Regular use of a mobile phone does not increase the risk of brain tumors, a major study has concluded.

Despite becoming a staple of modern life, there have been long-standing fears that our phones could emit cancer-causing radiation, often promoted by conspiracy theorists.

But an investigation that tracked more than 400,000 Britons over a decade found There is no link between regular mobile phone use and the prevalence of brain cancers.

Experts from the University of Oxford found that 0.41 per cent of women who used a mobile phone developed a brain tumour, compared to 0.44 per cent who never used the devices.

The study, which was conducted during the 2000s, adds to a growing body of evidence that dismisses concerns about phones and cancer, the researchers said.

Kirstin Pirie, a statistical analyst and co-author of the study, said: “Use of mobile phones under normal conditions does not increase the risk of brain tumors.”

Mobile phone users are not at increased risk of developing brain tumours, says a study led by researchers at the University of Oxford today.

Mobile phone users are not at increased risk of developing brain tumours, says a study led by researchers at the University of Oxford today.

DO MOBILE PHONES CAUSE BRAIN CANCER?

Fears about the carcinogenic potential of cell phones first surfaced in the 1990s, when cell phones became a staple in every home.

The statistics revealed a 34 percent increase in brain tumor diagnoses in the following 20 years.

But Cancer Research UK (CRUK) notes that mobile phone ownership in the UK increased by 500 per cent between 1990 and 2016.

If phones were to blame, the cancer rate would be expected to be substantially higher, they add.

In 2011, the International Agency for Research on Cancer, a subset of the World Health Organization, stated that phones may be a “possible cause of cancer” but felt there was not enough data to draw a clearer conclusion .

But later, larger studies found no link, according to CRUK.

In the US, the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the Federal Communications Commission conclude that there is no scientific evidence linking cell phones to cancer.

Cell phones emit radio frequency waves in the form of electromagnetic radiation from their antennas, says the National Cancer Institute.

The area of ​​the body closest to the antennae, usually the head, has the potential to absorb some of this energy.

However, numerous scientists have stated that this radiation is not ionizing.

Unlike X-rays, which are ionizing, these rays are “low energy, low frequency, and do not damage cells.”

Brain cancer rates likely increased along with mobile device use as doctors got better at diagnosing the disease over the years.

The study was published today in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

Conspiracy theorists have long claimed that radio waves emitted by phones can penetrate the skull and cause cancer when making a call.

The claims have become even more outrageous in recent years with the advent of 5G, which some claimed was related to the covid pandemic.

The Oxford researchers drew on data from 400,000 cancer-free women aged 50 to 80 between 2001 and 2011.

Participants were asked about their mobile phone use at the beginning and end of the study.

Their responses were compared to their health records both times.

The researchers then tracked whether someone developed three different types of brain tumor: meningioma, pituitary adenoma, and acoustic neuromas.

Other factors that may contribute to tumors, including age, BMI, alcohol intake, smoking and exercise levels, were also considered.

The results showed that people who used a phone in some way during the 10 years actually saw a 5 percent lower chance of developing brain cancer than those who never used one during the period.

Women who had used a phone daily during the period were slightly more likely, 1 percent higher.

Meanwhile, those who used a phone less than daily but had a lower risk than those who never used them: 3 percent less.

The experts said the small differences in risk between the groups were statistically insignificant.

Overall, of the 286,387 women who had never used a mobile phone in 2001, 1,261 developed a brain tumor in 2011, a rate of 0.44 percent.

Meanwhile, of the 556,131 who had used one, 2,278 ended the study with a brain tumor (0.41 percent).

Ms Pirie, an Oxford cancer expert, said: “These results support accumulating evidence that normal mobile phone use does not increase the risk of brain tumours.”

Fears about the carcinogenic potential of cell phones first surfaced in the 1990s, when cell phones became a staple in every home.

There was a 39 percent increase in brain tumor diagnoses over the next 20 years in Britain, according to Cancer Research UK.

In 2011, the International Agency for Research on Cancer, a subset of the World Health Organization (WHO), stated that phones could be a possible cause of cancer.

But he admitted there was not enough data to draw a conclusion and since then larger studies have been unable to find a link, and experts believe the increase could be due to better diagnosis.

Mobile phones emit radio frequency waves in the form of electromagnetic radiation from their antennas.

The area of ​​the body closest to the antennae, usually the head, has the potential to absorb some of this energy.

However, numerous scientists have claimed that this radiation is non-ionizing, which means that they are low energy, low frequency and do not damage cells unlike X-rays.

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