DAN WOOTTON: Swimmer Lia Thomas cannot and should not compete against women at the Olympics

Watching Good Morning America’s world exclusive interview with a trans swimmer lia thomas it was not an easy experience.

Of course, my heart went out to a person who openly admits to having been deeply troubled in recent years, tormented by suicidal thoughts and all the other mental torture that comes with believing you were born in the wrong body.

But I also felt deep sympathy for the female athletes who have trained for years and dedicated their lives to competing in the pool, only to be pulled out of the water by a biological male.

While it might not be politically correct to state the obvious in this woke up world, Lia still has all the physical attributes of a guy – yes, all of them – and, since she speaks with a deeper voice than I do, there is some illusion in her argument that a year of hormone treatment has been able to reverse much at all

Of course, Good Morning America, the ABC show that’s part of the increasingly politically correct Disney empire, tiptoed around the issue, but I refuse to.

Asked by ABC’s Juju Chang if she wanted to compete in the Olympics, a clearly ambitious Lia promised, “It’s been a goal of mine to swim in the Olympic trials for a long time and I’d love to do it.”

DAN WOOTTON: While it may not be politically correct to state the obvious in this waking world, Lia Thomas still has all the physical attributes of a guy, yes, all of them.

DAN WOOTTON: While it may not be politically correct to state the obvious in this waking world, Lia Thomas still has all the physical attributes of a guy, yes, all of them.

DAN WOOTTON: Watching Good Morning America's world exclusive interview with trans swimmer Lia Thomas was not an easy experience

DAN WOOTTON: Watching Good Morning America’s world exclusive interview with trans swimmer Lia Thomas was not an easy experience

As a huge fan and supporter of women’s sport, she is now clearly threatened by this form of trans extremism.

Oh, and if you point out that even a biological male on a sports team could change the entire outcome or watch a mediocre college athlete beat an Olympic medal winner in individual pursuit, you’re branded transphobic or TERF.

Well, to hell with that because the stakes are too high.

Lia has the right to live as she wants, but I regret that she cannot and should not compete in the Olympics against women.

The harsh reality is that, as a man, Lia was as likely to compete in the Olympics for the US team in swimming as there was for me to represent the GB team in gymnastics.

After all, in two years, the 22-year-old went from 554th in the 500-yard freestyle to first as a woman.

DAN WOOTTON: Lia has the right to live however she wants, but I'm sorry she can't and shouldn't compete in the Olympics against women.

DAN WOOTTON: Lia has the right to live however she wants, but I’m sorry she can’t and shouldn’t compete in the Olympics against women.

Emphasizing the obvious injustice, second place in the NCAA event went to Emma Weyant of Virginia, a silver medalist at the recent Tokyo Olympics, who was still 1.75 seconds behind Lia.

So what’s obvious is that the brief amount of hormone treatment she’s undergone since May 2019 during a year-long break from the sport, all that was required under the NCAA’s ridiculously lax guidelines, was totally ineffective in reversing the natural advantage as a biological man. .

Lia argued in the interview that almost immediately after starting HRT, she “lost muscle mass” and “became much weaker and slower in the water.”

When asked about the letter signed by 16 of her University of Pennsylvania swim teammates saying they fully support her right to ‘transition from male to female’ but arguing that ‘biologically, Lia has an unfair advantage about the competition in the female category’, she got defensive

You can’t go halfway and say, “I support trans women and trans people, but only up to a point.” Leah argued. “Whereas if you support trans women as women and they’ve met all the NCAA requirements, then I really don’t know if you can say something like that. Trans women are not a threat to women’s sport.’

Uh, bad.

As her teammates correctly argued in their letter: ‘If she were eligible to compete against us, she could now break Penn, Ivy and NCAA Women’s Swimming records; feats he could never have done as a male athlete.

The GMA then claimed that the science on transgender athletes is “new and evolving,” before interviewing an expert who made it abundantly clear that there is, in fact, no gray area: even years of hormone therapy doesn’t fundamentally change the argument. .

DAN WOOTTON: The harsh reality is that, as a man, Lia was as likely to compete in the Olympics for the US team in swimming as there was for me to represent the GB team in gymnastics.

DAN WOOTTON: The harsh reality is that, as a man, Lia was as likely to compete in the Olympics for the US team in swimming as there was for me to represent the GB team in gymnastics.

Dr. Michael Joyner, a physiologist and professor at the Mayo Clinic, explained the disparity, saying, “Obviously issues related to body size, airway size, hand size, foot size, maybe bone density, etc. But I think the main thing is the interactions between physical training and skeletal muscle.”

Asked by Juju if years of hormone therapy can’t put trans women in a place to compete against ‘cisgender women’, she replied: ‘I think the evidence so far would suggest that a period of one year, two years, three years , four years is probably not enough.

Lia had no answer to that scientific reality.

“I’m not a medical expert, but there is a lot of variation among cis female athletes,” she replied. ‘There are cis women who are very tall and very muscular and have more testosterone than other cis women. Should that also disqualify them?’

No, of course it shouldn’t, because all those athletes were born female.

So while I have a lot of sympathy for Lia Thomas, she seems to have very little for the women whose sports dreams she has shattered.

And she’s certainly not worried about her former UPenn classmates, who felt uncomfortable sharing locker rooms with someone with male genitalia who is still sexually attracted to women.

But for Lia, none of that matters in her quest to forever alter the dynamics of women’s sport.

As she said: “I knew there would be scrutiny against me if I competed as a woman, and I was prepared for that, but I also don’t need anyone’s permission to be myself and play the sport I love.”

I think she will be proven wrong.

Women’s sports organizations will soon catch on to the fact that their participation rates will plummet if young women think they can train for years, only to end up on the biggest stage competing against a trans athlete.

I am delighted that Lia Thomas is living her authentic life and sincerely wish her all the best, but sadly her lovely personal journey of fulfillment cannot come at the expense of women’s sport.

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