Ben Fogle writes an open letter to the editor of The Guardian on the “privileged pain” after the death of Ronaldo’s son

TV star Ben Fogle has written an emotional open letter to The Guardian’s editor-in-chief following the loss of Cristiano Ronaldo’s baby, two years after the newspaper used the term “privileged grief” when commenting on the death of david cameronIvan’s son.

Manchester United star Ronaldo, 37, and his partner, 28, georgina rodriguezannounced Monday night that one of her twins, a baby boy, had died.

Fogle, 48, whose own son Willem was stillborn at 33 weeks in 2014, posted the emotional post on his Instagram account yesterday, referencing the widely criticized leading article, which was published on The Guardian website in September 2019.

In the article, for which Viner later apologized to the Camerons, it was stated that the couple had experienced the ‘best-run and best-funded part’ of the National Health Service in the care her late son received due to David Cameron’s position in UK politics at the time.

scroll down for video

Ben Fogle, 48, has published an open letter to The Guardian's editor-in-chief, Katharine Viner, urging her to meet him to discuss the work of UK child bereavement charities.

Ben Fogle, 48, has published an open letter to The Guardian’s editor-in-chief, Katharine Viner, urging her to meet him to discuss the work of UK child bereavement charities.

In 2019, The Guardian published a featured article with the words

In 2019, The Guardian published a featured article with the words “privileged grief” while describing the loss of David Cameron and Samantha Cameron’s son Ivan in 2009 (Pictured: the paper’s editor-in-chief, Katharine Viner)

The post referenced Manchester United star Ronaldo, 37, and his 28-year-old partner, Georgina Rodriguez, who announced their son's death on Monday night.

The post referenced Manchester United star Ronaldo, 37, and his 28-year-old partner, Georgina Rodriguez, who announced their son’s death on Monday night.

The Cameron’s firstborn was born with Ohtahara syndrome, a rare neurological disorder that would cause him to suffer from 20 to 30 seizures a day. He died at the age of six.

Fogle said that while he accepted that Viner had apologized at the time, he had “ongoing anger” with her, claiming that she continues to refuse to meet with him to discuss the work of Tommy’s and Child Bereavement UK stillbirth charities.

In the four-mail letter, which he personally addressed to Viner, he wrote: “Your despicable article was a trigger for many ‘privileged’ people, like me, who have also lost a child.”

He added: “After the tragic news that Ronaldo and his wife [SIC] Georgina has lost her son, as a grieving “privileged” parent, I implore you to be careful with your words.

The reality star said that when the family lost Willem, he felt he “wanted to die” and said that while he did not seriously consider taking his own life, the words “illustrate how I felt emotionally.”

Describing her own pain, she said: ‘It is a pain I have lived with for many years. My little Willem would now be 7 years old. A correct boy. Running with his brother and his sister, doing mischief, being my partner.

The Camerons with their firstborn son, Ivan, in 2008. He was born with Ohtahara syndrome, a rare neurological disorder that caused him to have 20 to 30 seizures a day.  He died at the age of six in 2009.

The Camerons with their firstborn son, Ivan, in 2008. He was born with Ohtahara syndrome, a rare neurological disorder that caused him to have 20 to 30 seizures a day. He died at the age of six in 2009.

Fogle, pictured in 2021 with his wife Marina, said that

Fogle, pictured in 2021 with his wife Marina, said he “wanted to die” when his own son Willem was stillborn at 33 weeks in 2014, and urged Viner to “be careful” when describing the loss of Ronaldo.

In 2019, former Prime Minister Cameron spoke candidly about the anguish he and his wife Samantha suffered after the death of their six-year-old son Ivan, describing the resulting pain as “torture”.

Cameron – who has three other children, Nancy, 17, Arthur, 15 and Florence, 11 – revealed in his 2019 memoir the devastation the family endured during the last moments of Ivan’s life, saying it was “almost too painful to relate”. – and share their own frustrations at not having the ‘patience and selflessness’ required to be a ‘great caregiver’.

MailOnline has contacted The Guardian for comment.

Last week, Fogle admitted that white men have “dominated” the television landscape, but said he hopes the next generation of presenters will get opportunities based on talent, rather than tick boxes for diversity.

Fogle, 48, who found fame after his appearance on the 2000 reality show Castaway, said there are “a lot of brilliant presenters” from diverse backgrounds who need a “breakthrough opportunity” but said they need to have the skills and the right talent.

‘When I use the term “talent”, I think there must be a talent there. It can’t just be that you check the box,” she said in an interview with FEMAIL.

“I think we definitely need to give more opportunities to those who were previously invisible or silent. They also have to have the talent to live up to who they are and where they come from.

‘There will be a lot of brilliant presenters out there who need a big break and I hope they get there. And I think you have to have something to be on TV. You need charisma, consideration, you need an open mind, all those things.’

She added: “People like me, men, white presenters, have dominated the television landscape for many, many years,” she said, adding that there are also “a lot of great female voices, people of ethnic diversity, minority groups, people from other countries. , different religions’, which need to be heard.

Fogle spoke ahead of his new show Ben Fogle & The Lost City, airing next Thursday, in which the host visits an unincorporated Californian community known as Slab City or The Slabs.

In a recent interview with Femail, Ben Fogle admitted that white men have 'dominated' the television landscape, but said he hopes the next generation of presenters will get opportunities based on talent, rather than tick boxes for diversity.  Above, Fogle on his new show Ben Fogle & The Lost City, which airs Thursday.

In a recent interview with Femail, Ben Fogle admitted that white men have ‘dominated’ the television landscape, but said he hopes the next generation of presenters will get opportunities based on talent, rather than tick boxes for diversity. Above, Fogle on his new show Ben Fogle & The Lost City, which airs Thursday.

Fogle got his big break when he appeared on the BBC's Castaway 2000, an observational show where 36 contestants attempted to build a community in remote Scotland's Taransay.  She said it's much harder for today's reality stars to survive their 15 minutes of fame and build a career.

Fogle got his big break when he appeared on the BBC’s Castaway 2000, an observational show where 36 contestants attempted to build a community in remote Scotland’s Taransay. She said it’s much harder for today’s reality stars to survive their 15 minutes of fame and build a career.

In his new show, Ben traveled to California to meet the settlers who formed Slab City in the California desert, pictured

In his new show, Ben traveled to California to meet the settlers who formed Slab City in the California desert, pictured

Since 1961, Slab City has been relinquished by the California government and has become a haven for homeless people, many of whom struggle with addiction or hide from the law for various crimes, calling themselves “the last free place in America.” “.

The host said he felt ‘safe’, in part because he is a white male, and said some female hosts might not feel the same way if they were put in the same position.

“I know some very fearless presenters who would probably be offended if I said that,” he said.

‘But there is a lot of crime there, and there are people who hide from the law. You can’t hide from it. So maybe I felt safer because of who I am,’ he said, alluding to the fact that he was a white man.’

Fogle added that he was lucky to ‘survive’ his 15 minutes of fame after Castaway, but insisted he has worked hard to hone his skills in the decades since.

He admitted that it’s much harder for today’s reality TV stars to build a lasting career.

‘There are millions of shows now. Standing out and surviving your 15 minutes of fame is now a very, very difficult thing to do,” she said.

‘And if we go back in the timeline of the last 20 years, I would love for you to name any reality shows by people who have stood the test of time. There are not so many.

The presenter said that it was ‘complete luck that [he] he was in the right place at the right time and that his success was due to a lot of ‘serendipity’.

He continued, “I don’t want to have my own trumpet, but I think I’ve nurtured and developed my skills as a TV presenter over the last 20 years, so I still do.”

“Not because I was on a reality TV show, not because some people recognize me, not because I’m a Z-list celebrity, but because I have genuine empathy.”

The presenter said that he has found his place in the world of television and hopes that the television industry will focus on “honesty, integrity, curiosity and open-mindedness” in the future.

“A lot of television is obsessed with the ego and this word ‘celebrity,'” he said.

“I don’t even like the word celebrity, I think it’s quite offensive to be called a celebrity because it implies that you don’t have more substance to yourself, you’re just someone who is recognizable.”

The host added that he is “proud” that people who recognize him on the streets ask questions about his shows and the people who have been on them.

“That shows that I’m known for the substance of my shows, not my ugly face,” he said.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.